Home Creative writing Resist the Temptation to Withdraw From Senior Year Electives – The Knight Crier

Resist the Temptation to Withdraw From Senior Year Electives – The Knight Crier

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Emilie Dahms

Students working hard in one of their electives, Advanced Art 2.

The opinions expressed in the Op/Ed section of The Knight Crier do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the entire KC staff.

Many new opportunities come with being a senior at North Penn. Future seniors are often excited about the freedom and flexibility of their schedules for their senior year of high school, but with fewer course requirements, it leaves them the option of arriving late or leaving school early, which which seems quite attractive for senior citizens who have the opportunity, but it may not be the best option.

North Penn offers a variety of choices to suit every student. With many different options ranging from Maths, Art, Business, Science, English and many more options, there are plenty of creative choices for students. However, an option to skip school is easier than taking another class. This is why most students take advantage of it.

“More courses help students understand what they want to do in college. So many kids, when you ask them in their first year and even their senior year, they don’t know. But if they can follow some design principles and then some extra writing or creative writing or journalism classes, maybe even PE classes, math classes, you have a solid understanding of that that you might want to do after school. Voice teacher, Ms. Carrie Dixon said.

Taking creative electives can benefit students now and in the future. Taking most electives at North Penn is free, which can also benefit students financially so they don’t wait for college where they pay for the education. Students can further learn whether they like or dislike a certain activity while still young.

The advantage would be that you decide whether you want to follow it at university or not. In high school, there is no risk, it costs you nothing.

— Ms. Carrie Dixon

“The advantage would be that you decide whether you want to do it at university or not. In high school, there is no risk, it costs you nothing. If you might be thinking about architecture or engineering, you can take a few courses here and we have a great program with lots of good teachers… The teachers could also tell you more about courses at the university. So you get two things, the curriculum and the expertise of the teachers who might say, ‘Here’s what you can do with this degree’ or ‘Here’s what you can do with these classes,’” Dixon explained.

Having such a range of different courses helps students engage with different subjects and also with different people in the building.

“There are so many classes. Then these programs like allied health, biotech program, and technology center being here, kids can go there. But it also allows you to meet new people. So we have all these classes. Sometimes you branch out and end up with kids you haven’t met because there are 3,000 students in high school. So if you’ve never taken the digital photography or creative writing course and you’re here in a creative writing course with different personalities, you’re meeting new friends,” Dixon said.

The decision to take more classes depends on everyone’s schedule and everyone has different opinions about it. However, teachers particularly see the impact this has on students on a daily basis.

“I know the students like it. It changes the culture of the building. Students who arrive late and leave early are your best students in the building. They leave without taking those extra classes that we put so much time and energy into to make it interesting,” she said.

Students who arrive late and leave early are your best students in the building. They leave without taking those extra classes that we’ve put so much time and energy into making it interesting.

— Ms. Carrie Dixon

Students who leave earlier might also shy away from clubs and extracurricular sports. Students who leave around one o’clock could be impacted in their decision to join new activities, the thought process being “why should I go home just to get back to school?” Unfortunately, this is the reality for many students.

“You take [those seniors] away and now the top five percent of your student body is gone. So the assemblies that they may have organized in the end, they are not there for that. They’re all seniors, so when you walk down the halls at the end of the day, you miss those seniors who are able to help and encourage kids,” Dixon said.

Not taking advantage of the great abundance of courses at North Penn is overall a loss of opportunity for students who could benefit from the electives that make North Penn what it is. Electives benefit both students and their classmates, expanding the diversity of students in each class.